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Terrace of the Elephants

 The Terrace of the Elephants is part of the walled city of Angkor Thom. The terrace was used by king Jayavarman VII as a platform from which to view his victorious returning army. It was attached to the palace of Phimeanakas. Most of the original structure was made of organic material and has long since disappeared and most of what remains are the foundation platforms of the complex. The terrace is named for the carvings of elephants on its eastern side.

The 350m-long Terrace of Elephants was used as a giant reviewing stand for public ceremonies and served as a base for the king's grand audience hall. It has five outworks extending towards the Central Square-three in the centre and one at each end. The middle section of the retaining wall is decorated with life size garudas and lions; towards either end are the two parts of the famous parade of elephants complete with their Khmer mahouts.

 


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